Jill Morrow

JILL MORROW

Angel Cafe (Simon & Schuster 2003); The Open Channel (Simon & Schuster 2005); Newport (HarperCollins/William Morrow 2015)

9/1/13 – VISITS TO TARA

Millions of books were published last year. (Yes, really!) There’s a literary smorgasbord out there filled with more tasty stories than anyone could possibly devour in a single lifetime. Why, then, do we still make time to reread certain titles? (Continue reading)

Sally Whitney

SALLY WHITNEY

Author of the novel Surface and Shadowplus short stories appearing in journals and anthologies, including Best Short Stories from The Saturday Evening Post Great American Fiction Contest 2017.

 

9/1/13 – FINDING HONOR IN THE LOST SAINTS OF TENNESSEE

Aptly named, The Lost Saints of Tennessee by Amy Franklin-Willis is a story about loss—both the losses that are unavoidable and the ones we inflict on ourselves. But despite their losses, and there are many, the characters in this novel have a ragged nobility that comes from trying to do the right thing, even when the consequences turn out all wrong. That may not be enough to qualify for sainthood, but it was enough to keep me involved with these characters from start to finish. I enjoyed this book as much as any I’ve read in a long time.  (Continue reading)

Gary Garth McCann

GARY GARTH MCCANN

Author of the novel The Man Who Asked To Be Killed and five stories, most recently “Incorrigible,” Erotic Review and “The Yearbook,” Mobius

9/1/13 –INTERVIEW WITH ROB ROSS, AUTHOR OF JUGGLER’S BLADE

Rob Niccolini 1Rob Ross’s fantasy novel, Juggler’s Blade, was published during summer. I’ll review it on the 20th of the month on this site. Meantime I met the author for coffee in downtown Washington to ask him about his writing roots and about his reading taste. I find one of the best ways to discover good books to read is to ask authors of books I like what they recommend. (Continue reading)

Mark Willen

MARK WILLEN

Author of Hawke’s Point

9/1/13 —  TALKING ABOUT BOOKS WITH THE WASHINGTON POST‘S RON CHARLES

Courtesy Washington PostNext time you feel overwhelmed by the number of books on your to-read list, think of Ron Charles, the fiction editor at the Washington Post. Charles and his colleagues at the newspaper get 150 books a day to choose from, with a lot  careers depending on their decisions. I chatted with Ron recently about his job and how he approaches it.  Here is the transcript of our phone conversation, edited and condensed.

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